A community in Atlanta that brings together the alcohol industry with African American whiskey enthusiasts once more assembled to honor pioneering individuals with a yearly gathering.

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

During the weekend, Black Bourbon Society, the community-centered group available to all who appreciate high-quality alcoholic beverages and wish to deepen their understanding of America’s Indigenous Brew, organized another prestigious event recognizing Salon 7 Legacy Awards by Jack Daniels.

 

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

The event in Atlanta hosted at Lock & Key was merely one of numerous stops across the country for the tour that will head next to Harlem, New York  (April 21) and Dallas, Texas (June 16) – including newly established locations, Washington D.C (March 24)  and Los Angeles, California (May 19).

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

The tour will feature the Salon 7 Legacy Awards recognizing seven local Black leaders, innovators, and visionaries making an impact in their fields. These accolades honor the legacy of Jack Daniel’s and their inaugural master distiller, Nathan “Nearest” Green, and his invaluable contributions.

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

It was mentioned earlier that Salon 7 is an exclusive occasion comprising a roundtable debate, special mixes, and a whiskey tasting, drawing inspiration from the intimate gatherings of The Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 30s. The gathering gave recognition to local leading Black figures in different realms who are overcoming obstacles and creating a long-lasting legacy, bridging the historical narrative of Jack Daniel’s and its inaugural master distiller, Nathan “Nearest” Green.

In this year’s Atlanta halt of Salon 7, Samara B. Davis, the founder of the Black Bourbon Society, extended a warm welcome to attendees who took part in a panel dialogue, sampled signature drinks, and enjoyed a whiskey tasting session (single and double barrel).

barrel) conducted by Byron Copeland, Jack Daniels’ Whiskey Innovation and Maturation Manager.

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Throughout the gathering, seven influencers in the southern metropolis were recognized for their motivational efforts; Juan Smalls (Restaurateur and Owner, Virgil’s Gullah Kitchen & Bar, and The Breakfast Boys), Gregory ‘Gee’ Smalls (Restaurateur and Owner, Virgil’s Gullah Kitchen & Bar, and The Breakfast Boys), Thandi Walton (Bartender and Head of Beverage, Thompson Buckhead), Nzinga ‘Zing’ Shaw (President & CEO of Attack the Glass, LLC), Keri Richardson (Vice President, Brand Activations, ESSENCE Ventures,, AfroPunk and BeautyCon; and Owner, Alta Via Crèmerie), Dr. Fahamu Pecou (Artist and Founding Director, African Diaspora Art Museum of Atlanta (ADAMA), Maurice “Moetown” Lee (Music Industry Executive & Co-Producer Partner, ONE Music Fest), Jason “J” Carter (Founder, ONE Music Fest) and Dr. Natalie Hernandez-Green (Executive Director, Center for Maternal Health Equity at Morehouse School of Medicine)

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society Salon 7

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society Salon 7

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

There were numerous awardees present who delivered motivational speeches, such as Juan Smalls, who reminisced about how Atlanta unveiled the spectrum of opportunities for individuals of African descent.

Smalls mentioned, “I possess an unyielding determination to seek knowledge whenever necessary. Atlanta serves as an ideal canvas for this mindset. Upon my relocation in 2007, I was taken aback. It felt like stepping into a realm where endless possibilities exist. I grew up associating my Black heritage with poverty, pushing it away until I resided in Atlanta. Here, I encountered a world where black professionals, from doctors to lawyers, flourish. Atlanta shifted my viewpoint, leading me to embrace my black identity fully.”

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

Equally, J Carter shared his reflections on the recognition he and his ONE Music Fest co-founder, Moetown Lee, received in the city where they have continued to flourish. He attributed his flourishing legacy to his alma mater, Florida A&M University.

Black Bourbon Society

Source: Jonathan Cooper / @CoopernicusPhotos

“Born in Harlem and raised in Stone Mountain, I journeyed from Redan High to Florida A&M University, and it is there that my legacy began,” Carter confessed.

[…]

He further added, “I realized a marked change after settling in Atlanta. While I thought Harlem epitomized black culture, Atlanta showed me another facet of Blackness. This city is brimming with black leaders, entrepreneurs, and visionaries. Atlanta, like Florida A&M, fosters a nurturing environment to dream and a cushion to land on if you stumble. This is the essence of HBCUs.”

 

The awards ceremony was another tribute by the Black Bourbon Society to the spirit of Black excellence, showcasing the unique flair that defines the organization.

 

 

  For further details, please visit www.salonx7.com